For the fledgling conductor and Karajan ‘wannabe’, conservatoires, universities, and summer schools offer the chance to hone their craft, swapping practice in front of their bathroom mirrors for rehearsal time with mentors, accompanists or full-size symphony orchestras.

Yet for the aspiring baroque director, prospects of working within such a specialised field are far and few between. Teaming up with the Foundling Museum in 2010 and 2012, an institution well-known for its education associations, The English Concert is one of the few ensembles around the world to offer such an opportunity. Through days of intensive coaching, participants not only got to grips with instrumental music, but accompanying vocal soloists too.

Catch up with our young directors during the latest masterclass as our artistic director Harry Bicket puts them through their paces.

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